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Lime-Onion Taco Garnish

November 20th, 2019 Comments off

2 scallions, trimmed and thinly sliced crosswise (white and green parts)

1 small red onion, thinly sliced

1/4 cup lime juice (from 2 or 3 limes)

Kosher salt

Combine the scallions and half the red onion slices in a medium bowl.

Here’s a trick to give you less onion breath (you’ll thank us later!): Cover the onions and scallions with hot tap water and squeeze them a few times with your hands. Let them stand for about 2 minutes to extract their raw flavor, then drain.

Step 2

Combine the lime juice, the rinsed red onions and scallions, and a pinch of kosher salt in a small jar or liquid measuring cup. Let stand  for at least 10 minutes.

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Trahana Soup

September 1st, 2019 Comments off

 

Simple Trahana Soup With Lemon and Olive Oil

 

Source: NYTimes

This is just about the simplest dish to make with trahana, yet I find it incredibly satisfying and refreshing. I like it both hot and cold; it is cooling on a hot summer day and comforting on a cool one (we were in the middle of a bad heat wave when I was testing this week’s recipes). The soup is adapted from a recipe in Diane Kochilas’s new cookbook: “Ikaria: Lessons on Food, Life, and Longevity From the Greek Island Where People Forget to Die.” My favorite herb to use with the soup is fresh dill. If you want to add more ingredients, simmer vegetables of your choice in the broth, or add blanched or steamed vegetables to the soup when you serve it. Broccoli would be great, as would peas, beans, or sugar snap peas.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups sour bulgur trahana
  • 8 cups water, vegetable stock, or chicken stock
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice, strained
  • 6 tablespoons crumbled feta
  • Plain Greek yogurt for garnish (optional)
  • Chopped fresh herbs for garnish

Preparation

  1. In a medium soup pot heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat and add trahana. Stir until coated with oil, about 1 minute. Add water or stock and bring to a boil. Add salt and pepper to taste, reduce the heat and simmer, stirring often, until trahana is tender and nutty tasting and the broth slightly thickened, 15 to 20 minutes if using home-made bulgur trahana (if you use semolina or flour trahana the time will only be 8 to 12 minutes and the mixture will be more like a porridge).
  2. Remove from heat and stir in lemon juice. Spoon into bowls and top with a drizzle of olive oil and a tablespoon of crumbled feta. Garnish with plain yogurt if desired and chopped fresh herbs such as mint, parsley or dill.

Tip

  • Advance preparation: If you use bulgur trahana, which does not continue to thicken the way flour or semolina trahana does, you can make this up to 3 days ahead and keep in the refrigerator.
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Top Six Biases

August 11th, 2018 Comments off

The six most damaging biases:

  • confirmation bias
  • fundamental attribution error ( to interpret others’ behaviors as having hostile intent),
  • the bias blind spot (the feeling that one is less biased than the average person),
  • the anchoring effect (to rely too heavily, or “anchor”, on one trait or piece of information),
  • the representativeness heuristic (judging probabilities on the basis of resemblance),
  • projection bias (the assumption that everybody else’s thinking is the same as one’s own).
Categories: Economics, Humanism, Mind, Uncategorized Tags:

The Rules of Gay Sex

April 13th, 2018 Comments off

1. Harm No One
2. You don’t have to do anything you don’t want to do
3. Keep It Clean
4. Swallow — you need the protein
5. A towel can be handy

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Just Fine

March 1st, 2018 Comments off

Dopamine Itch

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Olive Oil

March 1st, 2018 Comments off

Olive oil is good for your skin. And a great lubricant.

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Signs of a Psychopath

September 5th, 2017 Comments off

The Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) is a diagnostic tool used to rate a person’s psychopathic or antisocial tendencies.

The twenty traits assessed by the PCL-R score are:

  • glib and superficial charm
  • grandiose (exaggeratedly high) estimation of self
  • need for stimulation
  • pathological lying
  • cunning and manipulativeness
  • lack of remorse or guilt
  • shallow affect (superficial emotional responsiveness)
  • callousness and lack of empathy
  • parasitic lifestyle
  • poor behavioral controls
  • sexual promiscuity
  • early behavior problems
  • lack of realistic long-term goals
  • impulsivity
  • irresponsibility
  • failure to accept responsibility for own actions
  • many short-term marital relationships
  • juvenile delinquency
  • revocation of conditional release
  • criminal versatility
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Some Tuesday

September 4th, 2017 Comments off

When I was a child growing up in Des Plaines, Illinois, we would often drive east toward Lake Michigan, to visit our cousins who lived in Wilmette, a suburb on the lake. On the way, we would pass by the beautiful Baha’i temple, a sparkling white jewel perched on a hill overlooking the clear blue waters of Lake Michigan. And afterwards, on the drive home, we kids would spot or favorite destination, a children’s amusement park unimaginatively named KiddieLand.

And not just on that trip home, but throughout the summer, we would constantly be pestering my father to take us to KiddieLand. An appropriately small collection of rides, we were fascinated by it. There was a train of child-size cars pulled by a real diminutive steam engine; a Ferris wheel with enclosed cars that I was talked into riding — once; and pony rides, where you got to control your own pony and where my brother’s pony bit my pony’s rump and I got a wild, galloping ride until the keeper ran out and stopped the steed, after which I was forever disinterested in things equestrian.

There was also a tiny miniature golf course, and the fact that you got a bunch of tickets that you could use for any ride you wanted, not to mention the cotton candy and the syrupy sweet ice cones.
So we pestered Dad to take us to KiddieLand, all the time, until he’d finally say okay, he’d take us.

“When, Daddy, when?”

“Some Tuesday.”

Some Tuesday.

Of course that Tuesday never came.

“It’s Tuesday, Dad, you said you’d take us on Tuesday!”

“I said some Tuesday, not this Tuesday.”

Kind of like how you say, “Let’s do lunch some time.” Nothing definite, just “some time.” Which time never comes.
Sort of like the promise held out by the famous Southern Hospitality. Oh, so jovial, so friendly when meeting you, and always quick with the good word a “godbless,” and that’s about that.

When Avis and I moved to South Carolina, we were looking forward to making new friends, and time after time we’d invite people to our house for drinks or for dinner, and people were happy enough to come and enjoy our hospitality, but they never invited us back.

Had we somehow insulted them? Perhaps we were simply of the wrong church (meaning not of our guest’s church). In the North we’d had no problem finding friends, but in South Carolina, I guess, people just didn’t reciprocate, not something that Carolinians do, for some reason.

I don’t know, maybe they’re waiting for just the right moment to invite us for dinner, drinks or just a chat.

Some Tuesday, perhaps.

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Chyrons and Attention

July 29th, 2017 Comments off

Why would any news channel run chyrons  during their broadcasts?

Chyrons are those annoying streaming banners at the bottom of your screen.  They seem to be feeding you the lastet headlines, mixed in with advertisements for the site’s reatured programs.

This is misguided.  It is well known that no one can pay attention to two things a once. (The best you can do is to switch attention from one thing to another and back, very fast.) So, the chyron simply distracts your attention from the actual news that is being presented, and you never get the message.

Categories: Economics, Mind, Uncategorized Tags:

ACA Debates

July 26th, 2017 Comments off

“In June and July 2009, with Democrats in charge, the Senate health committee spent nearly 60 hours over 13 days marking up the bill that became the Affordable Care Act. That September and October, the Senate Finance Committee worked on the legislation for eight days — its longest markup in two decades. It considered more than 130 amendments and held 79 roll-call votes. The full Senate debated the health care bill for 25 straight days before passing it on Dec. 24, 2009.”

–NY Times

Categories: Health Care, Uncategorized Tags: